Trilobite Pendant Necklace

$ 99.00 

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Trilobite Pendant Necklace
Trilobite Pendant Necklace

Above: Artist's Concept of a Trilobites on the move (Source: Mini Museum)

No creature exemplified the diverse nature of life more than the trilobite. This class of arthropods formed a staggering amount of different species throughout the Cambrian period. Today, over 5,000 different genera of trilobites have been discovered and named, with more surely waiting to be discovered.

This pendant features a single, Elrathia kingii trilobite, one of the most iconic species. Elrathia is most commonly found in Utah’s Wheeler Shale formation. Some specimens have even been discovered with fossilized soft tissues such as legs, gills, and antennae, giving us a clearer picture of the trilobite’s form in life. The estimated age is around 515,000,000 years old.


Above: A Trilobite pendant in the display/storage box.

The fossil is enclosed in sterling silver. All additional components of the necklace are also sterling silver, including our standard 18" (45cm) box-style chain. The bail is large enough to accommodate a heavier chain or cord for a more masculine appearance.

The necklace comes with a handsome display/storage box and a small information card that also serves as the certificate of authenticity. 

Please note: This specimen varies in size, though they average 0.75-1" in length. The sample shown here is representative of all specimens.

More About Trilobites

 

"We are beginning to understand how a group of animals sometimes regarded as ‘primitive’ were actually sophisticated and varied. Had it not been for the Permian extinction event they might be with us still." ~ Richard Fortey, paleontologist at the Natural History Museum in London.

 

It is through diversification and evolution that life is able to succeed. No creature exemplified this principle more than the trilobite. This class of arthropods formed a staggering amount of different species throughout the Cambrian period. While all species shared some common aspects, each would evolve unique adaptations that set them apart. Today, over 5000 different genera of trilobites have been discovered and named, with more surely waiting to be discovered.

The common structure that all trilobites share is rather simple. They had a hard exoskeleton composed of three lobes: left, right, and center. Their bodies are also segmented into a cephalon (head), thorax (body), and pygidium (tail). From this base, trilobites evolved into a myriad of strange and unique forms.

This trilobite belongs to Elrathia kingii, one of the most iconic species. Elrathia is most commonly found in Utah’s Wheeler Shale formation. Some specimens have even been discovered with fossilized soft tissues such as legs, gills, and antennae, giving us a clearer picture of the trilobite’s form in life.

Spiny exteriors were a common adaptation and were used by some species to ward off predators while others developed spines as a hunting tool. Compound eyes were found in many species, with some having enormous oculars giving them nearly 360-degree vision. Specialized exoskeleton articulation even allowed them to roll into a ball. Trilobites varied in size as well, from a mere tenth of an inch long to the massive 28 inch Isotelus Rex.

Trilobites had an incredibly varied amount of lifestyles to match their many variations in form. Fossils have been discovered in areas that would have been shallow basins of salt water as well as the floors of ancient trenches. Ocean floor scavengers, predators, filter feeders, swarming schools, and even open water swimmers have all been suggested modes of survival of different groups. There is even evidence some species made short trips onto dry land.

The trilobite’s appearance in the fossil record is somewhat mysterious. It is thought that they first appeared in what is now modern-day Siberia nearly 500 million years ago, though their origin before this is shrouded. Early trilobites diversified so quickly any common ancestor is unclear. Trilobites flourished throughout the Cambrian period and survived for hundreds of millions of years through several mass extinction events until the Permian extinction finally caused the last species to die out.

Today, trilobite fossils are found all over the world, marking the spaces that once held ancient marine life. Being widespread through the Cambrian period, they serve as excellent stratigraphic markers and help to date other rocks and specimens found near them. Their calcite exoskeletons fossilize wonderfully, though the soft tissues that made up their legs and organs are rarely found. Their eye structures however were also made up of calcite, allowing scientists to study the delicate compound lenses that allowed trilobites to see.

In these ancient and strange creatures, we can find the diverse history of evolution on planet Earth. Held within the trilobite is evidence of life’s tenacity to adapt to anything.

Further Reading:

Fortey, Richard A. “The Lifestyles of the Trilobites: These Denizens of the Paleozoic Era Seas Were Surprisingly Diverse.” American Scientist, vol. 92, no. 5, 2004, pp. 446–453.

Briggs, Derek E. G., et al. "Middle Cambrian Arthropods From Utah." Journal of Paleontology, vol. 82, no. 2, 2008, pp. 238-254. 

Chatterton, Brian D. E., and Stacey Gibb. "Latest Early To Early Middle Devonian Trilobites From The Erbenochile Bed, Jbel Issoumour, Southeastern Morocco." Journal of Paleontology, vol. 84, no. 6, 2010, pp. 1188-1205.

 

Above: Back of the Specimen Card

 

 
Trilobite Pendant Necklace
Trilobite Pendant Necklace