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Plesiosaur Tooth in Matrix - SOLD 1.53"

Plesiosaur Tooth in Matrix - SOLD 1.53"

Featuring a long, snake-like neck and a stout body equipped with slender paddles, Plesiosaurs are one of the most readily identifiable of all ancient marine reptiles.

This very unique specimen is a Plesiosaur tooth embedded in matrix. It was recovered from deposits in Morocco and dates to the Late Cretaceous Period.

The exposed tooth measures 1.53". The surrounding matrix also includes a number of additional fossils. The specimen ships in a sturdy shipping carton. A small information card is also enclosed that also serves as the certificate of authenticity. 

Please Note: All Plesiosaur teeth will show signs of repair (typically small cracks repaired with penetrative stabilizers). Some teeth will be reassembled. This is the nature of this item and is completely normal. In some cases, we have opted to vertically orient the specimen in pictures to give a better view of the tooth. 

Above: Portrait of Mary Anning by an unknown artist, sometimes referred to as Mr. Grey. In the background is the Golden Cap headland, the highest point on the South Coast of England. Sleeping in the foreground is Tray, Ms. Anning's dog and fossil collecting companion. Tray was trained to sit next to interesting finds while Anning retrieved her equipment from other locations. He perished under a sudden cliff-face collapse in 1833 which nearly took Ms. Anning's life as well.


Yet, despite her firsthand experience and deep knowledge of these subjects, Ms. Anning was unable to take part officially in the scientific societies of the day which were only open to men. Her discoveries and observations were instead shared through others, with the one notable exception being her drawing of a complete Plesiosaur. In this instance, the noted French anatomist Georges Cuvier proclaimed the animal a hoax. It would take numerous examinations and debate before Cuvier would reverse his position and admit he'd rushed to judgement.


Ms. Anning died in 1847 of breast cancer. It would take another 163 years for the Royal Society to recognize her influence in the advancement of science.

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